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ABOUT US

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Who Benefits?

We are an all volunteer group with all money raised by the local Twin Falls TETWP staying local. We started out by providing mammograms for those who had no insurance or high deductible insurance and we still do that. But thanks to the great support from the Magic Valley, we have expanded our giving to include the expensive procedure, Breast Cancer Diagnostic Examination, which is the next step if a mammogram reveals anything suspicious.


We also contribute to the Mountain States Institute’s emergency Breast Cancer Fund, which helps with the expenses incurred by those going through Breast Cancer Treatment. We have also been able to fund training for a much needed Lymphedema Therapist. If you are planning a fundraiser and would like to donate to your local TETWP we would appreciate it. If you would like further information about us or would like to contribute please contact: Mandy Ash, President Twin Falls Tough Enough To Wear Pink 208-308-9978 tftetwp@gmail.com

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Are You Tough Enough To Wear Pink?

Tough Enough to Wear Pink was created by entrepreneur and breast cancer survivor Terry Wheatley in 2004 with Karl Stressman, former director of special events for Wrangler and now commissioner of the Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association (PCRA) Wheatley to bring the sport of professional rodeo and the western community together to rally against breast cancer. Wrangler is the title sponsor of Tough Enough To Wear Pink. Since its inception in 2004, TETWP has empowered rodeos and western events in the U.S. and Canada to focus attention on the need for a cure. To date, the campaign has raised over $12 million dollars for breast cancer charities, much of which stays right in the community. The grassroots movement has inspired other sports communities to mount their own TETWP campaigns, spreading a message of hope and support that reaches beyond the rodeo arena to competitors, families and fans across America.

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How It All Began

In 2004, Terry was looking forward to attending the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas as she had for many years. Her son Wade Wheatley was a consistent WNFR finalist in team roping (header) and her husband Jim had been a six-time WNFR team roping qualifier himself. Terry was a senior executive at a major wine company sponsoring the WNFR telecast.

But Terry had recently undergone breast cancer surgery and, although things looked positive, it was on her mind. She had lost her grandmother to breast cancer, her mother had a double mastectomy before the age of 40 and her daughter Katie had undergone two surgical biopsies before the age of 20.


“It seemed as if everyone I knew was affected” recalls Terry. “I felt a very strong need to somehow take action.”


Terry realized from her own situation that early diagnosis and treatment was key to a successful outcome. She toyed with some ideas to rally the rodeo and western community to get that message across. And then the big one hit. What if, on one night of rodeo’s greatest spectacle, the competitors could be convinced to wear pink shirts? Not a color normally associated with rugged events such as bull riding and steer wrestling, but that was the point. That was how to make a statement. Broadcast on national television, no less. All she had to do was make it happen. In three weeks.

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How It All Began

In 2004, Terry was looking forward to attending the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas as she had for many years. Her son Wade Wheatley was a consistent WNFR finalist in team roping (header) and her husband Jim had been a six-time WNFR team roping qualifier himself. Terry was a senior executive at a major wine company sponsoring the WNFR telecast.

But Terry had recently undergone breast cancer surgery and, although things looked positive, it was on her mind. She had lost her grandmother to breast cancer, her mother had a double mastectomy before the age of 40 and her daughter Katie had undergone two surgical biopsies before the age of 20.


“It seemed as if everyone I knew was affected” recalls Terry. “I felt a very strong need to somehow take action.”


Terry realized from her own situation that early diagnosis and treatment was key to a successful outcome. She toyed with some ideas to rally the rodeo and western community to get that message across. And then the big one hit. What if, on one night of rodeo’s greatest spectacle, the competitors could be convinced to wear pink shirts? Not a color normally associated with rugged events such as bull riding and steer wrestling, but that was the point. That was how to make a statement. Broadcast on national television, no less. All she had to do was make it happen. In three weeks.

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